AP US History Practice Test: Period 9 (1980–Present) (2024)

Table of Contents
Questions 1–2 refer to the following excerpt: Which of the following statements best describes President Reagan’s economic policies? What consequences did President Reagan’s foreign policy have? Question 3 refers to the following excerpt: What caused the collapse of the USSR? Questions 4–5 refer to the following excerpt from a 1995 federal resolution: What consequences did the introduction of new digital communications technologies have in the late 20th and early 21st centuries? What changes were the hallmark of the post-industrial economy of the late 20th and early 21st centuries? Question 6 refers to the following excerpt: What consequences, if any, has migration from Latin America and Asia had on the US in the late 20th and early 21st century? Question 7 refers to the following excerpt from a speech by President Bill Clinton in 1995: What role, if any, did the United States take in world affairs following the end of the Cold War? Questions 8–11 refer to the following excerpt: President Bush's "new world order" primarily referred to: The "crisis in the Persian Gulf" mentioned in the excerpt refers to: The "threat of terror" mentioned by President Bush foreshadowed: President Bush's vision of a "new world order" emphasized: Questions 12–15 refer to the following excerpt: President Obama's speech primarily emphasizes: The phrase "perfect our union" in the speech alludes to: The "challenges of our time" mentioned by President Obama likely refer to: President Obama's emphasis on "different stories" and "common hopes" suggests: Questions 16–19 refer to the following excerpt: President Clinton's vision for a "new government" emphasizes: The phrase "does more with less" suggests: The "preeminent mission" of the new government, as described by Clinton, is to: Clinton's vision of a government that is "humble" but "strong" suggests: Questions 20–23 refer to the following excerpt: President Bush's address primarily conveys: The phrase "our very freedom came under attack" suggests: The reference to "acts of mass murder" and the nation's response indicates: President Bush's emphasis on the "foundation of America" being untouched suggests: References

Question 1

Questions 1–2 refer to the following excerpt:

“It’s morning again in America. Today more men and women will go to work than ever before in our country’s history. With interest rates at about half the record highs of 1980, nearly two thousand families today will buy new homes, more than at any time in the past four years. This afternoon 6,500 young men and women will be married, and with inflation at less than half of what it was just four years ago, they can look forward with confidence to the future. It’s morning again in America, and under the leadership of President Reagan, our country is prouder and stronger and better.”

—Campaign Commercial for Ronald Reagan, 1984

Which of the following statements best describes President Reagan’s economic policies?

A

The Fair Deal — a second “New Deal” wherein the government increased spending in order to boost the economy.

B

Stagflation — the use of inflation to reduce unemployment.

C

Shrinkflation — the use of inflation to reduce the national deficit.

D

Supply side economics — using deregulation and cutting taxes to boost the economy.

Question 1 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). Also known as “Reaganomics,” supply-side economics cut taxes on the wealthy in order to stimulate investment in the economy and boost employment. Reagan also confronted unionized air-traffic controllers and deregulated the banking and natural gas industries.

Question 2

“It’s morning again in America. Today more men and women will go to work than ever before in our country’s history. With interest rates at about half the record highs of 1980, nearly two thousand families today will buy new homes, more than at any time in the past four years. This afternoon 6,500 young men and women will be married, and with inflation at less than half of what it was just four years ago, they can look forward with confidence to the future. It’s morning again in America, and under the leadership of President Reagan, our country is prouder and stronger and better.”

—Campaign Commercial for Ronald Reagan, 1984

What consequences did President Reagan’s foreign policy have?

A

His policy of détente led to greater communication and cooperation with the USSR.

B

His policy of “roll back” led to more American intervention in world affairs and conflict with the USSR.

C

Reagan was an isolationist who kept the US out of world affairs.

D

Reagan continued the US policy of containment because he cut military spending.

Question 2 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The “Reagan Doctrine” was a major shift away from the previous policy of containment. Instead of preventing the spread of Soviet influence, Reagan sought to “roll back” their gains. He armed insurgents in Afghanistan, expanded the US nuclear arsenal, invaded Grenada, and assisted anti-Communist forces in Nicaragua.

Question 3

Question 3 refers to the following excerpt:

“At the Berlin Wall itself, which is 3 meters high, people had climbed up and were sitting astride. The final slab was moved away. A stream of East Germans began to pour through. People applauded and slapped their backs. A woman handed me a giant bottle of wine, which I opened and she and I began to pour cups of wine and hand them to the East Germans. Journalists and TV reporters struggled to hold their cameras.”

—A first-hand account of the fall of the Berlin Wall, 1989

What caused the collapse of the USSR?

A

Increased political and military pressure from the United States.

B

Political reforms within the Soviet Union.

C

Economic problems within the Soviet Union.

D

All of the above.

Question 3 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). President Reagan’s confrontational attitude towards the USSR put financial pressure on the regime to increase defense spending. The Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev also initiated political and economic reforms within the USSR that encouraged more openness and freedom of speech. Finally, the Soviet economic system was very inefficient, which increased opposition and resentment within the USSR. All of these tensions combined to destroy the USSR.

Question 4

Questions 4–5 refer to the following excerpt from a 1995 federal resolution:

“‘Internet’ refers to the global information system that— (i) is logically linked together by a globally unique address space based on the Internet Protocol (IP) or its subsequent extensions/follow-ons; (ii) is able to support communications using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite or its subsequent extensions/follow-ons, and/or other IP-compatible protocols; and (iii) provides, uses or makes accessible, either publicly or privately, high level services layered on the communications and related infrastructure described herein.”

—Federal Networking Council Resolution, 1995

What consequences did the introduction of new digital communications technologies have in the late 20th and early 21st centuries?

A

A significant decrease in economic activity because so many people were distracted at work.

B

Improved access to information.

C

Birth of new social behaviors and networks.

D

Both B and C.

Question 4 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). The introduction of the internet, smartphones, email and other communications technologies have had a profound effect on daily life. Digital communications have changed the way people interact with each and made it very easy to access a wide variety of information. Improved communications technologies actually expanded economic opportunities by facilitating transactions.

Question 5

“‘Internet’ refers to the global information system that— (i) is logically linked together by a globally unique address space based on the Internet Protocol (IP) or its subsequent extensions/follow-ons; (ii) is able to support communications using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite or its subsequent extensions/follow-ons, and/or other IP-compatible protocols; and (iii) provides, uses or makes accessible, either publicly or privately, high level services layered on the communications and related infrastructure described herein.”

—Federal Networking Council Resolution, 1995

What changes were the hallmark of the post-industrial economy of the late 20th and early 21st centuries?

A

A growing service sector and declining manufacturing industry.

B

A growth of union membership and booming manufacturing industry.

C

A decline in the service sector and growth in the manufacturing industry.

D

Growth in real wages for the lower/middle class and less economic inequality.

Question 5 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). The birth of the “Rust Belt” highlights some of the characteristics of the new post-industrial economy. Many manufacturing jobs went to the “Sun Belt” or overseas and the economy shifted towards the service sector. Economic inequality increased and union membership declined.

Question 6

Question 6 refers to the following excerpt:

“The journey was horrible… You walked for hours. You’d lose your toenails. Your feet just start breaking apart. You start getting hungry. You start hallucinating… We swam across. The river was really cold… The conditions didn’t matter, there’s nothing worse than Honduras.”

—A description of illegally crossing the US/Mexican border

What consequences, if any, has migration from Latin America and Asia had on the US in the late 20th and early 21st century?

A

None — immigration from these regions increased only slightly and for a brief period of time.

B

Immigration sparked economic, political, and cultural tension.

C

Immigration led to the establishment of English as the official language of the US.

D

Both B and C.

Question 6 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). Increased immigration led to controversy over immigration control policies and proposed reforms. In addition, opponents of immigration have voiced concern about economic competition from migrants and threats to American national identity.

Question 7

Question 7 refers to the following excerpt from a speech by President Bill Clinton in 1995:

“With the Cold War over, some people now question the need for our continued active leadership in the world. They believe that, much like after World War I, America can now step back from the responsibilities of leadership… I strongly disagree…We're all vulnerable to the organized forces of intolerance and destruction, terrorism, ethnic, religious and regional rivalries, the spread of organized crime and weapons of mass destruction and drug trafficking.”

—Bill Clinton, 1995

What role, if any, did the United States take in world affairs following the end of the Cold War?

A

None — the US withdrew into isolationism despite President Clinton’s opposition.

B

None — debate over the appropriate role for the US in world affairs paralyzed the nation’s leaders.

C

US leaders unanimously abstained from any military interventions but did allow the US to become a global economic leader.

D

Although debate raged, the US led many diplomatic and peacekeeping initiatives.

Question 7 Explanation:

The correct answer is (D). President Clinton’s speech encapsulates the debate over the appropriate role for the US in world affairs after the end of the Cold War. Despite domestic opposition, the US participated in many peacekeeping missions in Haiti, Bosnia, and Somalia.

Question 8

Questions 8–11 refer to the following excerpt:

"We stand today at a unique and extraordinary moment. The crisis in the Persian Gulf, as grave as it is, also offers a rare opportunity to move toward an historic period of cooperation. Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective — a new world order — can emerge: a new era — freer from the threat of terror, stronger in the pursuit of justice, and more secure in the quest for peace. An era in which the nations of the world, East and West, North and South, can prosper and live in harmony."

—George H.W. Bush, "Toward a New World Order," 1990

President Bush's "new world order" primarily referred to:

A

A vision for global cooperation and peace in the post-Cold War era.

B

The establishment of a single global government.

C

The economic dominance of the United States.

D

The expansion of NATO into Eastern Europe.

Question 8 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). In his speech, President Bush articulated a vision for a "new world order" characterized by global cooperation, peace, and harmony in the aftermath of the Cold War. This vision emphasized the potential for nations to work together to address global challenges and promote shared values.

Question 9

"We stand today at a unique and extraordinary moment. The crisis in the Persian Gulf, as grave as it is, also offers a rare opportunity to move toward an historic period of cooperation. Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective — a new world order — can emerge: a new era — freer from the threat of terror, stronger in the pursuit of justice, and more secure in the quest for peace. An era in which the nations of the world, East and West, North and South, can prosper and live in harmony."

—George H.W. Bush, "Toward a New World Order," 1990

The "crisis in the Persian Gulf" mentioned in the excerpt refers to:

A

The Iranian Revolution.

B

Iraq's invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent Gulf War.

C

The Arab-Israeli conflict

D

The rise of Islamic fundamentalism.

Question 9 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The "crisis in the Persian Gulf" that President Bush referred to was Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in 1990, which led to international condemnation and the subsequent Gulf War. This crisis highlighted the challenges and opportunities for international cooperation in the post-Cold War era.

Question 10

"We stand today at a unique and extraordinary moment. The crisis in the Persian Gulf, as grave as it is, also offers a rare opportunity to move toward an historic period of cooperation. Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective — a new world order — can emerge: a new era — freer from the threat of terror, stronger in the pursuit of justice, and more secure in the quest for peace. An era in which the nations of the world, East and West, North and South, can prosper and live in harmony."

—George H.W. Bush, "Toward a New World Order," 1990

The "threat of terror" mentioned by President Bush foreshadowed:

A

The rise of the Soviet Union.

B

The spread of communism in Asia.

C

The increasing global challenges posed by terrorism in the 21st century.

D

The economic challenges of the 1990s.

Question 10 Explanation:

The correct answer is (C). While terrorism was not a new phenomenon, President Bush's mention of the "threat of terror" in the context of the "new world order" foreshadowed the increasing global challenges posed by terrorism, especially as it became a central focus of U.S. foreign policy in the 21st century, particularly after the 9/11 attacks.

Question 11

"We stand today at a unique and extraordinary moment. The crisis in the Persian Gulf, as grave as it is, also offers a rare opportunity to move toward an historic period of cooperation. Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective — a new world order — can emerge: a new era — freer from the threat of terror, stronger in the pursuit of justice, and more secure in the quest for peace. An era in which the nations of the world, East and West, North and South, can prosper and live in harmony."

—George H.W. Bush, "Toward a New World Order," 1990

President Bush's vision of a "new world order" emphasized:

A

A return to isolationist policies.

B

The importance of international cooperation and collective security.

C

The dominance of Western values and institutions.

D

The establishment of a global currency.

Question 11 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). President Bush's speech emphasized the potential for nations to collaborate in addressing global challenges and promoting peace, justice, and security. His vision of a "new world order" was rooted in the idea of international cooperation and collective security, where nations would work together to ensure global stability. This perspective is reflected in APUSH Standard Key Concept 9.2.II.B, which delves into the U.S.'s efforts to foster international cooperation in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Question 12

Questions 12–15 refer to the following excerpt:

"I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for our children and our grandchildren."

—Barack Obama, "A More Perfect Union," 2008

President Obama's speech primarily emphasizes:

A

The importance of unity and collective action in addressing national challenges.

B

The need for economic reforms and policies.

C

The U.S.'s role in international conflicts.

D

The significance of technological advancements in the 21st century.

Question 12 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). In this excerpt, President Obama underscores the significance of unity, understanding, and collective action in addressing the challenges facing the nation. He emphasizes the shared hopes and aspirations of the American people, regardless of their diverse backgrounds.

Question 13

"I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for our children and our grandchildren."

—Barack Obama, "A More Perfect Union," 2008

The phrase "perfect our union" in the speech alludes to:

A

The Preamble to the U.S. Constitution and the ongoing journey to realize its ideals.

B

The economic prosperity of the United States.

C

The U.S.'s relationship with international allies.

D

The technological advancements of the 21st century.

Question 13 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). The phrase "perfect our union" is a nod to the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution, which begins with "We the People" and expresses the aspiration to "form a more perfect union." President Obama's use of this phrase emphasizes the ongoing journey of the United States to live up to its foundational ideals and principles.

Question 14

"I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for our children and our grandchildren."

—Barack Obama, "A More Perfect Union," 2008

The "challenges of our time" mentioned by President Obama likely refer to:

A

A combination of economic, social, political, and environmental challenges facing the U.S. in the 21st century.

B

The rise of new global superpowers.

C

The decline of American cultural influence.

D

The U.S.'s withdrawal from international treaties.

Question 14 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). While President Obama doesn't specify the "challenges of our time" in this particular excerpt, given the broader context of his 2008 campaign and presidency, it's clear he's referring to a myriad of economic, social, political, and environmental challenges that the U.S. was grappling with at the time. This includes the economic recession, healthcare reform, climate change, and more.

Question 15

"I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for our children and our grandchildren."

—Barack Obama, "A More Perfect Union," 2008

President Obama's emphasis on "different stories" and "common hopes" suggests:

A

A call for a single narrative of American history.

B

An acknowledgment of America's diversity and a call for unity despite differences.

C

The importance of individualism over collectivism.

D

A critique of the American education system.

Question 15 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B).In the speech, President Obama acknowledges the diverse backgrounds and stories of the American people. However, he emphasizes that despite these differences, there are shared aspirations and dreams. This acknowledgment of diversity, coupled with a call for unity, reflects the broader themes of multiculturalism, inclusivity, and the American mosaic.

Question 16

Questions 16–19 refer to the following excerpt:

"We need a new government for a new century—humble enough not to try to solve all our problems for us, but strong enough to give us the tools to solve our problems for ourselves; a government that is smaller, lives within its means, and does more with less. Yet where it can stand up for our values and interests around the world, and where it can give Americans the power to make a real difference in their everyday lives, government should do more, not less. The preeminent mission of our new government is to give all Americans an opportunity, not a guarantee, but a real opportunity to build better lives."

—Bill Clinton, "Bridge to the 21st Century," 1996

President Clinton's vision for a "new government" emphasizes:

A

A balance between limited government intervention and empowering citizens.

B

A return to traditional conservative values.

C

The expansion of government control over the economy.

D

The establishment of a global governing body.

Question 16 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). In this excerpt, President Clinton articulates a vision for a government that is both limited in its interventions but also empowering to its citizens. He emphasizes the need for a government that provides tools and opportunities rather than guarantees.

Question 17

"We need a new government for a new century—humble enough not to try to solve all our problems for us, but strong enough to give us the tools to solve our problems for ourselves; a government that is smaller, lives within its means, and does more with less. Yet where it can stand up for our values and interests around the world, and where it can give Americans the power to make a real difference in their everyday lives, government should do more, not less. The preeminent mission of our new government is to give all Americans an opportunity, not a guarantee, but a real opportunity to build better lives."

—Bill Clinton, "Bridge to the 21st Century," 1996

The phrase "does more with less" suggests:

A

Efficiency and fiscal responsibility in government operations.

B

The reduction of U.S. military presence worldwide.

C

The privatization of public services.

D

A decrease in foreign aid and international commitments.

Question 17 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). President Clinton's mention of a government that "does more with less" underscores the idea of a government that operates efficiently, making the most of its resources while being fiscally responsible. This sentiment reflects the broader discussions of the 1990s about government efficiency, budgetary concerns, and fiscal responsibility.

Question 18

"We need a new government for a new century—humble enough not to try to solve all our problems for us, but strong enough to give us the tools to solve our problems for ourselves; a government that is smaller, lives within its means, and does more with less. Yet where it can stand up for our values and interests around the world, and where it can give Americans the power to make a real difference in their everyday lives, government should do more, not less. The preeminent mission of our new government is to give all Americans an opportunity, not a guarantee, but a real opportunity to build better lives."

—Bill Clinton, "Bridge to the 21st Century," 1996

The "preeminent mission" of the new government, as described by Clinton, is to:

A

Ensure wealth distribution among all citizens.

B

Provide opportunities for all Americans to improve their lives.

C

Guarantee equal outcomes for all individuals.

D

Expand the welfare state and social programs.

Question 18 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). President Clinton emphasizes that the primary mission of the government is to provide opportunities—not guarantees—for all Americans to better their lives. This focus on opportunity over guaranteed outcomes reflects a central theme of Clinton's presidency and the broader political discourse of the 1990s.

Question 19

"We need a new government for a new century—humble enough not to try to solve all our problems for us, but strong enough to give us the tools to solve our problems for ourselves; a government that is smaller, lives within its means, and does more with less. Yet where it can stand up for our values and interests around the world, and where it can give Americans the power to make a real difference in their everyday lives, government should do more, not less. The preeminent mission of our new government is to give all Americans an opportunity, not a guarantee, but a real opportunity to build better lives."

—Bill Clinton, "Bridge to the 21st Century," 1996

Clinton's vision of a government that is "humble" but "strong" suggests:

A

A retreat from international affairs and commitments.

B

A government that recognizes its limitations but is effective where needed.

C

A complete overhaul of the federal system.

D

A shift towards a more authoritarian regime.

Question 19 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). In the speech, President Clinton describes a vision of a government that is both "humble" in recognizing its limitations and "strong" in its capacity to be effective where necessary. This balance between humility and strength encapsulates the broader debates of the 1990s about the role and scope of government in various sectors of society.

Question 20

Questions 20–23 refer to the following excerpt:

"Today, our fellow citizens, our way of life, our very freedom came under attack in a series of deliberate and deadly terrorist acts... These acts of mass murder were intended to frighten our nation into chaos and retreat. But they have failed; our country is strong. A great people has been moved to defend a great nation. Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America."

—George W. Bush, "Address to the Nation on September 11, 2001"

President Bush's address primarily conveys:

A

A message of resilience and determination in the face of a national tragedy.

B

A call for immediate military retaliation.

C

The need for domestic policy reforms.

D

A shift towards isolationist policies.

Question 20 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). In this address, President Bush emphasizes the resilience, strength, and determination of the American people in the face of a devastating terrorist attack. He assures the nation that while the physical structures might have been damaged, the foundational values and spirit of America remain unshaken.

Question 21

"Today, our fellow citizens, our way of life, our very freedom came under attack in a series of deliberate and deadly terrorist acts... These acts of mass murder were intended to frighten our nation into chaos and retreat. But they have failed; our country is strong. A great people has been moved to defend a great nation. Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America."

—George W. Bush, "Address to the Nation on September 11, 2001"

The phrase "our very freedom came under attack" suggests:

A

The perception that the attacks were not just on physical structures but on American values and way of life.

B

The immediate need for constitutional amendments.

C

A critique of domestic policies.

D

A call for economic reforms.

Question 21 Explanation:

The correct answer is (A). President Bush's statement underscores the idea that the 9/11 attacks were perceived not just as assaults on specific locations but as broader attacks on the American way of life, values, and freedoms.

Question 22

"Today, our fellow citizens, our way of life, our very freedom came under attack in a series of deliberate and deadly terrorist acts... These acts of mass murder were intended to frighten our nation into chaos and retreat. But they have failed; our country is strong. A great people has been moved to defend a great nation. Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America."

—George W. Bush, "Address to the Nation on September 11, 2001"

The reference to "acts of mass murder" and the nation's response indicates:

A

A shift in U.S. foreign policy priorities.

B

The beginning of a prolonged U.S. engagement in global counter-terrorism efforts.

C

The U.S.'s withdrawal from international treaties.

D

A focus on domestic economic challenges.

Question 22 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). The 9/11 attacks marked a significant turning point in U.S. foreign policy, leading to a prolonged engagement in global counter-terrorism efforts, including wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. President Bush's address foreshadows this shift in priorities and the nation's commitment to combating terrorism.

Question 23

"Today, our fellow citizens, our way of life, our very freedom came under attack in a series of deliberate and deadly terrorist acts... These acts of mass murder were intended to frighten our nation into chaos and retreat. But they have failed; our country is strong. A great people has been moved to defend a great nation. Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America."

—George W. Bush, "Address to the Nation on September 11, 2001"

President Bush's emphasis on the "foundation of America" being untouched suggests:

A

A call for rebuilding physical infrastructure.

B

A belief in the enduring strength and values of the American nation.

C

The need for a new constitutional convention.

D

A critique of the American education system.

Question 23 Explanation:

The correct answer is (B). In his address, President Bush underscores the idea that while the terrorist attacks caused significant physical damage, the core values, principles, and spirit of the American nation remain intact and unshaken.

Once you are finished, click the button below. Any items you have not completed will be marked incorrect. Get Results

There are 23 questions to complete.

AP US History Practice Test: Period 9 (1980–Present) (2024)

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Carmelo Roob

Last Updated:

Views: 5515

Rating: 4.4 / 5 (65 voted)

Reviews: 80% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Carmelo Roob

Birthday: 1995-01-09

Address: Apt. 915 481 Sipes Cliff, New Gonzalobury, CO 80176

Phone: +6773780339780

Job: Sales Executive

Hobby: Gaming, Jogging, Rugby, Video gaming, Handball, Ice skating, Web surfing

Introduction: My name is Carmelo Roob, I am a modern, handsome, delightful, comfortable, attractive, vast, good person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.